Ramaphosa – swart bemagtiging kommissie

Swart bemagtiging wetgewing – volg die voetspore van Ramaphosa en Rob Davies, 2000 … 1999 … 1998 …  Kommissie se bespreking rakende swart bemagtiging op 12 September 2000 – voorsitter Ramaphosa.    Blankes word uitgesluit van wetgewing en beleidsdokumente.
2000 – Ramaphosa chaired the Black Economic Empowerment Commission, which helped establish South Africa’s broad-based empowerment policies.  That started in 1998.    Here also very important opinions during the 2000 discussions in Parliament.   (B-BBEE) Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is a racially selective legislations launched by the South African government to redress the inequalities of Apartheid by giving black (Blacks, Coloureds and Indians) South African citizens economic privileges not available to Whites.  Chinese people are part of it to apply for work under B-BBEE .    He further discussed weaknesses.

bbbee kommissie

 

TRADE AND INDUSTRY PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE

He chaired the Black Economic Empowerment Commission, which helped establish South Africa’s broad-based empowerment policies.  That started in 1998.   

Here also very important opinions during the 2000 discussions in Parliament.  If blacks are so weak, why must we pay for another 50 to 100 years for changes in their weaknesses and all the immigrants still coming in.

Is just then obvious, blacks changed one weakness with another one and then blame the whites for their own weaknesses.

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2000

Prof Turok (ANC) described the document as very impressive and as proposing a kind of new RDP.   

Mr Lott Ndlovu, Commissioner of the Black Economic Empowerment Commission, assisted with the responses to some questions, including this one. He stated that there are two separate threads to consider: black professionals and black capitalists.   He stated that neither thread is strong enough to make a major contribution here.

He indicated that organisations of black professionals have frequent changes in their leadership as their leaders have other opportunities, so these organisations are inherently weak. He stated that black business is more an idea than a reality and that blacks have historically been simply consumers.

He also noted that the black bourgeoisie almost does not see the need to mobilise and that its members are not helpful because they begin to think that they have succeeded because of their personal merit and then refuse to help others.

Mr Ramaphosa stated that the patriotism is there among black professionals and black businesses but that it needs to be nurtured, encouraged, and enhanced on an ongoing basis. He stated that these communities need to articulate progressive positions.

Portfolio Report / Minutes 2000:

The Black Economic Empowerment Commission was formed two and a half years ago to study ways to empower black South Africans to participate more fully in the economy. Cyril Ramaphosa, Chairperson of the Black Economic Empowerment Commission, explained the basic elements of the documents that would come from the Commission.

He spoke of black economic empowerment as part of the transformation process, explained the need for it, and set out the institutions that the Commission would be proposing to implement this. These include an Investment for Growth Accord, a Black Economic Empowerment Act, and other implementing agencies. Following the presentation, there was extensive discussion. 

Ramaphosa se kommissie 1998

Mr Ramaphosa explained first the need to define black economic empowerment and the Commission’s focus on it as a transformative process aimed at redressing past inequities and ensuring meaningful economic participation by black people. He explained that there is both a moral and an economic case for this process, the latter because of the economic repercussions of marginalising the black majority outside the economy.

Second, Mr Ramaphosa spoke of a Black Economic Empowerment Act. After briefly referring to the situation of black women in South Africa, he stated that this Act would address a need for a measure of coordination. It would define black economic empowerment, set out indicators by which the private and public sectors would measure progress, set procurement targets, and require government departments to file annual black economic empowerment reports.

At this point, Mr Ramaphosa referred to his experiences in business and the phenomenon of companies on journeys of self-discovery with employment equity legislation that are learning how they have wasted resources and ignored the need to uplift the disadvantaged. He stated that the parameters in the Act could give guidance to people to pull up their socks and join the new South Africa.

He explained that the Commission proposes three implementing agencies. First, there needed to be a body in the President’s office (which he called the National Empowerment Commission) so that these issues would be at the highest level. Second, there should be a National Procurement Agency that would change government tendering. Third, the document explained the more complex proposal for a National Empowerment Funding Agency that would address issues of capital availability.

Finally, Mr Ramaphosa referred briefly to the need for an integrated Human Resources Strategy that would address the great crime of the denial of appropriate education to black people. This would be a key to unlock the future for all. He also briefly referred to the need for institutional and structural changes that would address rural development.

Mr Zita (ANC) asked how black economic empowerment relates to class forces among workers, the black middle class, and the black bourgeoisie. He noted that workers might want to own businesses or work for cooperatives. Mr Ramaphosa gave his comment on workers as owners as “why not?”. He indicated that the report would call for new forms of ownership in terms of community ownership and even share ownership. He stated that the Commission was also studying cooperatives.

Mr Ramaphosa concluded that the report would find ways for many more people to be players in the economy and that it is exciting to try to spread ownership. Mr Ndlovu added that unions themselves are often capitalists through their investments and there are issues about the clarity of their position on class issues. Mr Ndlovu stated that the issue of whether race or class is the prior issue in South Africa has not been resolved. He said that it is similar to the issue of whether black women are women first or black first. He said that the answers to such questions have important implications but that we do not yet have answers.

Mr Zita (ANC) also asked what happens if white business disagrees with the proposals. Mr Ramaphosa emphasised that the recommendations in the report would be modest, would not be about “prescribed assets”, and would avoid disrupting the market. He said that he could see no reason for white business to oppose them. He indicated that he had met with captains of industry and discussed with them the fact that the way to avoid becoming another Zimbabwe is to take proactive steps to deal with problems sooner rather than later.

Ms September (ANC) also asked whether part of the training aspect FOR black people would be training BY black people. Mr Ramaphosa noted that an African proverb reminds us that if you point a finger, you point three at yourself. He stated that training by black people is very important. Mr Ndlovu later added an extra comment that it is very important not to let training become an excuse. He stated that not every black person needs training and it is important to endorse training without falling into the myth that so long as they have life in their bodies, all black people need to be constantly in training sessions.

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https://www.bbbeecommission.co.za/about-the-commission/

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Racism in South Africa / Rassisme

Regstellende aksie – B-BBEE

Ramaphosa : B-BBEE

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5 gedagtes oor “Ramaphosa – swart bemagtiging kommissie”

  1. […] 2000 – Ramaphosa chaired the Black Economic Empowerment Commission, which helped establish South Africa’s broad-based empowerment policies.  That started in 1998.    Here also very important opinions during the 2000 discussions in Parliament.   (B-BBEE) Black Economic Empowerment (BEE) is a racially selective legislations launched by the South African government to redress the inequalities of Apartheid by giving black (Blacks, Coloureds and Indians) South African citizens economic privileges not available to Whites.  Chinese people are part of it to apply for work under B-BBEE .    He further discussed weaknesses. Ramaphosa – swart bemagtiging kommissie […]

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