Germany



By 1935, Wünsdor became the headquarters of the Wehrmacht, the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany. Under Hitler’s leadership, Wünsdor became a powerful military stronghold. They built a modern underground communications center called Zeppelin, which had walls up to 3.2 meters thick, and several bombproof bunkers with 80-centimeter thick roofs, and disguised as rural homes.


REVEALED: Photos unveil Nazi's hidden 'Forbidden City' base | World | News  | Express.co.uk

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An abandoned secret military complex once run by the Nazis is now open to the public. Tourists can now visit the so-called forbidden city where once the Kaiser, Hitler and the Soviets were militarily active. It served as the Nazis’ command centre for the Army during World War II. During the Cold War that followed, it was the headquarters for the Soviets’ military high command. Much of the complex was destroyed after the end of the war by the Soviets, but a huge underground bunker still remains. The forbidden city as it was dubbed during Soviet times – because German locals were only rarely allowed to enter with special permission – is still off-limits for the public most of the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUfYWocdT-g

Ander skakels

More information

https://www.express.co.uk/news/world/760503/Photographs-unveil-hidden-Nazi-German-Forbidden-City-Soviet-stole-during-Cold-War

Off-limits: tours of former Nazi military compound
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b5JIoz_g9aU

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The Abandoned Soviet Camp of Wünsdorf in Germany | Amusing Planet

Die plek is naby Berlin geleë en het ook bekendgestaan as Klein Moskou in Oos-Duitsland.  Die inwoners daar het heelwat geriewe gehad, maar was nie ‘n konsentrasiekamp soos waardeur ons voorgeslagte moes wortel nie.   Daar was goed beskermde ondergrondse geboue waar hul kon skuil teen bomme en aanvalle.

About 25 miles south of Berlin lies the small town of Wunsdorf, home to about six thousand inhabitants. But less than thirty years ago it had a population of sixty thousand, of which fifty thousand were soldiers of the Red Army. They lived inside one of the biggest military bases in Europe and the biggest Soviet military camp outside the USSR. The former headquarters of Soviet forces in Germany was so large that it was known as “Little Moscow”, with daily trains going to the Soviet capital. Inside, there were schools, shops, hospitals and leisure facilities.

By 1935, Wünsdor became the headquarters of the Wehrmacht, the unified armed forces of Nazi Germany. Under Hitler’s leadership, Wünsdor became a powerful military stronghold. They built a modern underground communications center called Zeppelin, which had walls up to 3.2 meters thick, and several bombproof bunkers with 80-centimeter thick roofs, and disguised as rural homes.

 

https://www.amusingplanet.com/2017/04/the-abandoned-soviet-camp-of-wunsdorf.html

wunsdorf-forbidden-city-3

https://www.amusingplanet.com/2017/04/the-abandoned-soviet-camp-of-wunsdorf.html

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Headquarters to the Nazis and then the Soviets, the East German military camp of Wünsdorf was once home to 75,000 Soviet men, women and children. 

Wünsdorf’s military history began long before it became a Soviet garrison town. The whole area was militarised after the German Empire was formed in 1871. During the first world war, Germany’s first mosque was built here, for Muslim POWs – many of whom were coerced into fighting for Germany. 

In 1935, Wünsdorf became headquarters for the Wehrmacht, the German Armed Forces. The Nazis’ entire second world war campaign was guided from the Zeppelin underground communications bunker at Wünsdorf, providing direct contact through telex to the fronts at Stalingrad, France, Holland and even Africa.

They left behind a legacy of abandoned ruins. Near Wünsdorf alone, Sperenberg Airfield is still abandoned, as are airfields at Rangsdorf, Oranienburg and Schönwalde, while military camps at Jüterbog, Kummersdorf, Vogelsang, Bernau, Krampnitz, Grabowsee and elsewhere still await new purpose. 

The Nazis’ buildings were of such strong construction, with walls over a metre thick, that they proved very difficult to damage – a fact evidently appreciated by the Soviets after the SS had fled. After sufficiently damaging the bunker complexes to make them unsuitable for military use according to the Potsdam Agreement, the Soviets settled in.

Once home to as many as 75,000 Soviet men, women and children, Wünsdorf – located about 25 miles from Berlin – was the high command for Soviet forces in Germany and the biggest Soviet military camp outside the USSR. But it also had shops, schools and leisure facilities, and was known as “Little Moscow”, with daily trains going to the Soviet capital. 

When they departed after the final military parade, they left a vast site littered with 98,300 rounds of ammunition, 47,000 pieces of ordnance, 29.3 tonnes of munitions and rubbish, including chemicals, waste oil, old paint, tyres, batteries and asbestos. Shops were left full of electronics, radios, TVs and fridges. Families were in such a hurry they couldn’t take everything. Houses were full of domestic appliances. Even pets were left behind.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/jan/11/forbidden-city-inside-abandoned-soviet-camp-wunsdorf-east-germany

Taken in 1915

Allied prisoners of war exercising at Wünsdorf in 1915.

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Niks hiervan ooit herwin of gerehabiliteer nie – dit bly steeds ‘n negatiewe uitsig oor wat was en nagevolge wat alles ingehou het.   Enige oorlog is ‘n duur proses en min wenners stap as oorwinnaars.  Hoeveel radio aktiwiteit nog aanwesig is, sal niemand weet nie.

6 June 2021 – Urban exploration: Abandoned Soviet airbase in Germany



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More information on Germany

Communism horrors

Poland and Germany

Operation Chastise and Dambusters – Germany

Een gedagte oor “Germany”

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