Nuclear – Zuma – Malema

Is dit regtig Malema wat agter alles sit of is die Zuma faktor steeds op die horison wat nog nie verdwyn het nie?   Watter rolle speel hierdie parlementslede – vir hulself, party of vir die groter magte?   Of sit die Russe self agter alles  – hulle was ook betrokke in Angola ‘n paar jaar gelede.   En na 1994 is hul deel van BRICS, wat deel is van die “bendes” en was mekaar se hande.

Nuclear energy

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There are interesting parallels between state capture in Russia and South Africa, which culminated in the nuclear deal that would have benefited two distinct groups of “oligarchs” in the two countries.   Twenty-five years ago Russia and South Africa set out to redistribute control of their economies after the fall of the Soviet Union and apartheid South Africa.

Within two decades, powerful, new and corrupt oligarchs in both countries found they had common interests in the nuclear deal that would have shattered the South African economy.

RUSSIA’S INVOLVEMENT IN SOUTH AFRICAN NUCLEAR ENERGY AND MINING IS PART OF A MAJOR INCREASE IN ITS AFRICAN INFLUENCE

The two companies that stood to benefit from the nuclear deal were Rosatom, the Russian nuclear company founded by Putin, and Oakbay Resources and Energy, owned by the Guptas and the former president’s son, Duduzane Zuma.

Rosatom was formed in 2007 and is Russia’s largest electricity company, with 33 nuclear power plant projects in 12 foreign countries.   Rosatom is the biggest nuclear construction company in the world and the world’s leading uranium enricher.

Putin is listed in Rosatom documents as its “founder”. Rosatom’s executive authority resides with the nine members of its supervisory board.   It includes Sergey Korolev, head of economic security at the Federal Security Service.

The other eight are top government officials: Two assistants to Putin; one representative of the president in the far-eastern district, Yury Trutnev; one Cabinet minister (Alexander Novak, energy) and one deputy minister (Andrei Klepach, for economic development); the head of the Military Industrial Commission, Igor Borovkov; and the full-time general director of Rosatom, Alexey Likhachev.   All have intelligence backgrounds, mostly going back to the KGB, many from Putin’s kindergarten in the KGB in St Petersburg.

Vladimir Strzhalkovsky was chief executive officer (CEO) of the Russian mining giant, Norilsk Nickel, the world’s leading producer of nickel and palladium, and an important producer of other platinum group metals.    It owns the largest deposits of nickel, copper and palladium in the world and now operates in both South Africa and Botswana.

In The President’s Keepers, journalist Jacques Pauw refers to the arrival in early 2011 of an alleged “donation for Nkandla” on a private jet at King Shaka International Airport north of Durban.   The shipment originated in Russia and the sender was Strzhalkovsky, who is part of Putin’s second wave of Russian oligarchs drawn from the St Petersburg KGB.

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The SA Revenue Service (Sars) impounded the equipment, Pauw alleges, Strzhalkovsky brought because it lacked clearance certificates and documents.   Cwele told the then Sars commissioner, Oupa Magashula, to release it because it concerned “state security” – his agents were taking control of it.   Magashula relented because state security overrode customs laws.   “There was a lot of cash on that plane,” said Pauw’s source.   “A lot. Sars detained the plane with everything on board. When Cwele moved in he took over the whole shipment, including the money. The money was also not cleared and therefore illegally imported. Its origin and destination were never determined.” 

Strzhalkovsky received a payout of $100 million (R1.49 billion) for brokering a settlement between rival shareholders at Norilsk Nickel.

https://city-press.news24.com/News/how-russia-eased-its-way-into-sa-nuclear-20200204


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The leader of Economic Freedom Fighters Julius Malema, was the most vociferous critic of the R1 trillion nuclear deal former President Jacob Zuma tried to seal with the Russians.

It was a deal that Zuma was so keen on he re-shuffled his Cabinet and fired former Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene for refusing to support it.   Malema did not turn his back on it, but  has done a 180-degree turn on nuclear energy and is dead keen that Eskom should build nuclear power stations; so keen that he marched with his red berets to Megawatt Park to hand over a memorandum   to Eskom, which included a demand for nuclear power stations.

If we lived in a rational, selfless world, the choice of energy for our future electricity would be clear. We should choose the safest, cleanest, most reliable, sustainable, economic energy. But the real world is irrational and selfish, and so we choose on ideology, politics and vested interests. South Africa faces an uncertain energy future because Eskom has been wrecked by corruption and incompetence, and because our new electricity sources are being chosen by green ideology and renewable energy interests. This wretched scene is made worse by trade-union lobbying, political factionalism and – alas! – the racial divide. Our present is the awful mess of Eskom. Our possible future is the dreadful IRP 2019 (Integrated Resources Plan 2019), a sure recipe for failure.

Electricity supply is one of the few areas where the state can outperform the private sector – for the simple reason that its cost of capital is lower and it is satisfied with a lower return. Eskom used to outperform every private electricity utility on Earth. Proponents of private electricity suggest it will solve the country’s electricity problems, but every existing IPP (Independent Power Producer) makes more expensive electricity than Eskom. Private supply is now associated with ‘renewable’ energy (here, meaning solar and wind), which is very expensive all round the world. This gives the private sector a bad name. Julius Malema and his like have pounced upon this.

Under our ruinous REIPPPP (renewable energy programme), Eskom is forced to buy extremely expensive renewable electricity, locked into 20-year contracts. It must pay 215 cents/kWh for this unreliable electricity when its own average selling price is about 89 cents/kWh. The comrades in the ANC and the unions are making capital out of this. An even bigger problem for renewable electricity is the system costs, the enormous costs of integrating the unreliable renewables into the grid. This is why electricity costs rise as you add more renewables to the grid, and why Germany and Denmark, with a high fraction of renewables, have the highest electricity costs in Europe.

Racial ideologues now say that coal and nuclear are ‘black’ and wind and solar are ‘white’. The ANC, the EFF, the SACP and the unions favour state control. The ANC, which is mainly black, controls the state, the state controls Eskom, and Eskom runs coal and nuclear stations. The private renewable energy companies are run by whites, including the foreign companies. The ‘greens’ are mainly ‘white’. The black ideologues believe – rightly, I think – that white-owned foreign renewable companies are screwing the people of South Africa with their very expensive electricity.

Nuclear power is the worst victim of this battle. Nuclear is the safest, cleanest, most reliable, most sustainable source of energy we know, and very economic. Koeberg is our best performing generator. President Zuma, presiding over the most corrupt era of ANC rule, was probably trying to get some sort of nuclear power deal with the Russians from which he expected corrupt benefit.

The Russians, who make superb VVER nuclear power reactors, are cynical on matters where diplomacy and commerce overlap, and would probably have gone along with any government-to-government deal. Our constitution would never have allowed any corrupt deal.

Racial ideologues now say that coal and nuclear are ‘black’ and wind and solar are ‘white’. The ANC, the EFF, the SACP and the unions favour state control. The ANC, which is mainly black, controls the state, the state controls Eskom, and Eskom runs coal and nuclear stations. The private renewable energy companies are run by whites, including the foreign companies. The ‘greens’ are mainly ‘white’. The black ideologues believe – rightly, I think – that white-owned foreign renewable companies are screwing the people of South Africa with their very expensive electricity.

Nuclear power is the worst victim of this battle. Nuclear is the safest, cleanest, most reliable, most sustainable source of energy we know, and very economic. Koeberg is our best performing generator. President Zuma, presiding over the most corrupt era of ANC rule, was probably trying to get some sort of nuclear power deal with the Russians from which he expected corrupt benefit. The Russians, who make superb VVER nuclear power reactors, are cynical on matters where diplomacy and commerce overlap, and would probably have gone along with any government-to-government deal. Our constitution would never have allowed any corrupt deal.

Malema’s backing of nuclear energy could nuke it – Andrew Kenny

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It was already reported in 2014 about Rosatom…   and it is possible that why Ramaphosa want the money from the pension funds and used to do it?   Pension funds will never get it back.

Sources in both countries speculate that Russia overplayed its hand late last year when its state-owned nuclear vendor Rosatom was well placed to build eight new reactors for South Africa.   After months of high-level lobbying and negotiations between the two countries, Russian media began to report the deal as a fait accompli. In the run-up to the Atomex Africa Forum organised by Rosatom in Johannesburg in November, the state-owned news agency RIA Novosti reported that Rosatom is “to build eight nuclear electricity units in South Africa. Formal agreements about this are to be signed … on the fringes of Atomex”.

But the agreement announced at Atomex was a rather less definitive nuclear co-operation agreement. A nuclear correspondent for another state-owned news agency, Itar-Tass, quoted Energy Minister Ben Martins as saying: “All legal procedures under Rosatom’s agreement with South Africa on co-operation in nuclear energy will be completed by February 15 next year [2014]”. This was confirmed by a Rosatom spokesperson at the time.

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A month beforehand, Business Day reported that an unsigned draft co-operation agreement between South Africa and Russia was circulating among government officials. It reportedly contained a clause giving the Russians a veto over any other agreements South Africa might enter into with other countries – and, thereby, the upper hand.

Another source, who claims to have lobbied for the Russians, said that there is a difference between how Russia and South Africa operate. “When something’s done, the Russians believe it’s done, and they say it’s done. But they forget that here in South Africa we have something complicated called a democracy.”

Helmer has flagged a strange deal in which a company with links to President Jacob Zuma intended buying the majority Russian-owned stake in an iron and steel producing company based in eMalahleni, Mpumalanga. Occurring almost in tandem with Russian negotiations on the nuclear deal, this has led Helmer to speculate that the two deals might be connected.

Zuma and Russian President Vladimir Putin met at the fifth Brics [Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa] summit in Durban in March last year and discussed nuclear co-operation, among other topics. Two days later, Russian steelmaker Evraz announced that a previously unknown entity called Nemascore intended to buy its 85.11% stake in Evraz Highveld Steel and Vanadium for $320-million.

First, Nemascore had been registered only the previous month. Second, one of its directors, Linda Makatini, is Zuma’s one-time legal adviser and a business associate of Zuma’s sons, Duduzane and Mxolisi “Saady” Zuma. Further enquiries have revealed that Nemascore shares an address with the Sandton premises of a law firm belonging to Zuma’s current legal adviser, Michael Hulley.

Third, Nemascore offered Evraz more than double what its stake was worth on the market at the time. The day before the Brics summit began, Evraz Highveld’s market value was only $140-million.

Helmer reported that the Russian state bank VTB would lend Nemascore the money to buy Evraz’s stake, and speculated that it meant cash in hand for Zuma’s connections while the Russians awaited a positive outcome on the nuclear deal. VTB is also expected to offer South Africa the financing it needs should it opt for Rosatom reactors.

https://mg.co.za/article/2014-03-06-intrigue-of-trillion-rand-nuclear-prize/

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BRICS ….   Rusland is ook in Mosambiek betrokke by die noordelikste provinsie waar daar groot neerslae van gas is.   Welwillendsheidsbesoekie van die Russe.

Rusland was diep betrokke in Angola voor 1994 !!

Russia in Africa – Summit October 2019

 

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