Russia-Zimbabwe military base

During its recent meetings in Russia, the President, Vladimir Putin, has reportedly set his eyes on opening a Russian strategic military base in Zimbabwe, as Moscow ratchets up her new foreign policy in Africa spearheaded by a rash of military cooperation and arms deals across the continent.   President Emmerson Mnangagwa, said to have reached out to his Russian counterpart, with the firefighting aim of securing a possible economic bailout package, as the economy continues to decline to stratospheric levels, characterised by fuel and cash shortages; a balance of payment crisis; exorbitant prices and extortionate taxes; coupled with doctors and teachers strikes.

Image result for Darwendale mine map diamonds zimbabwe

The presidency maintains that Mnangagwa’s expensive trip on a chartered luxury plane, is a campaign to intensify engagement and re-engagement efforts with the International community and foreign investors. Not much details about the reported Russian economic package have been released to the media, but government insiders say vice president, Rtd General Constantino Chiwenga, was initially sent to negotiate for the financial lifeline by Mnangagwa, when he visited Russia in August 2018, “to deliver a special message” to Putin from Mnangagwa.

The disclosures about the military base are sure to cause curiosity with the West, and come on the backdrop of press reports yesterday from Moscow that, the Central African Republic (CAR) government is open to Russia setting up an army base on their soil, with CAR’s defense minister, Marie-Noëlle Koyara, confirming the development to the state-run RIA Novosti news agency.

Russia signed various agreements

Russia officially announced her intention to set up a naval base in Saylac, Somaliland, last April. A delegation from the Kremlin held talks with Somaliland for a 1 500 man base to support its warships and hunter-killer submarines to operate in the volatile region and busy shipping lanes that carry most of Europe’s goods.

Russia also signed an agreement with Eritrea in September 2018 for a planned Russian logistics base, which would give it access to the Red Sea, as Moscow officials crisscross from the Horn to the Great Lakes and Southern Africa.

The establishment of military bases abroad enable a country to among other things, project power, conduct expeditionary warfare, and thereby influence events abroad. Depending on their size and infrastructure, they can be used as staging areas or for logistical, communications and intelligence support.

According to highly placed military sources, the planned Russian military base might end up being built either in Kanyemba or Darwendale, where Russia has known mineral interests, although the exact location for the military installation is for now unknown.

Kanyemba District is home to Zimbabwe’s virgin uranium deposits, first discovered by German prospectors in the 1980s but remained untapped due to low world prices, and inconclusive feasibility studies of the mineral.

Darwendale now boast of the country’s biggest platinum mine, operated jointly between Harare and Moscow, through a company called Great Dyke, formed between the Zimbabwe Mining Development Corporation and three Russian companies VI Holdings, Rostec, and Vneshconombank.

“This sensitive issue (army base) first came up when former leader, Robert Mugabe, visited Moscow to discuss implementation of the US$4 billion platinum mine deal made by Russian in Darwendale in 2015,” said one of the sources based at Gava Musungwa Zvinavashe Barracks in Masvingo.

Russian President, Vladimir Putin, has reportedly set his eyes on opening a Russian strategic military base in Zimbabwe, as Moscow ratchets up her new foreign policy in Africa spearheaded by a rash of military cooperation and arms deals across the continent, Spotlight Zimbabwe reported.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa, on the other hand is said to have reached out to his Russian counterpart, with the firefighting aim of securing a possible economic bailout package, as the economy continues to decline to stratospheric levels, characterised by fuel and cash shortages; a balance of payment crisis; exorbitant prices and extortionate taxes; coupled with doctors and teachers strikes, all but leaving Mnangagwa’s days in office in limbo, as the opposition lines up a series of mass revolts against his troubled administration.

Mnangagwa is off to Russia next week, and will visit four other nations which include: Belarus, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Switzerland for the World Economic Forum (WEF).

The presidency maintains that Mnangagwa’s expensive trip on a chartered luxury plane, is a campaign to intensify engagement and re-engagement efforts with the International community and foreign investors. Not much details about the reported Russian economic package have been released to the media, but government insiders say vice president, Rtd General Constantino Chiwenga, was initially sent to negotiate for the financial lifeline by Mnangagwa, when he visited Russia in August 2018, “to deliver a special message” to Putin from Mnangagwa.

The disclosures about the military base are sure to cause curiosity with the West, and come on the backdrop of press reports yesterday from Moscow that, the Central African Republic (CAR) government is open to Russia setting up an army base on their soil, with CAR’s defense minister, Marie-Noëlle Koyara, confirming the development to the state-run RIA Novosti news agency.

Harare should Putin’s plan sail through will also join Eritrea and Somaliland, in playing host to Russian bases in their backyards.

Russia officially announced her intention to set up a naval base in Saylac, Somaliland, last April. A delegation from the Kremlin held talks with Somaliland for a 1 500 man base to support its warships and hunter-killer submarines to operate in the volatile region and busy shipping lanes that carry most of Europe’s goods.

Russia also signed an agreement with Eritrea in September 2018 for a planned Russian logistics base, which would give it access to the Red Sea, as Moscow officials crisscross from the Horn to the Great Lakes and Southern Africa.

The establishment of military bases abroad enable a country to among other things, project power, conduct expeditionary warfare, and thereby influence events abroad. Depending on their size and infrastructure, they can be used as staging areas or for logistical, communications and intelligence support.

According to highly placed military sources, the planned Russian military base might end up being built either in Kanyemba or Darwendale, where Russia has known mineral interests, although the exact location for the military installation is for now unknown.

Kanyemba District is home to Zimbabwe’s virgin uranium deposits, first discovered by German prospectors in the 1980s but remained untapped due to low world prices, and inconclusive feasibility studies of the mineral.

Darwendale now boast of the country’s biggest platinum mine, operated jointly between Harare and Moscow, through a company called Great Dyke, formed between the Zimbabwe Mining Development Corporation and three Russian companies VI Holdings, Rostec, and Vneshconombank.

“This sensitive issue (army base) first came up when former leader, Robert Mugabe, visited Moscow to discuss implementation of the US$4 billion platinum mine deal made by Russian in Darwendale in 2015,” said one of the sources based at Gava Musungwa Zvinavashe Barracks in Masvingo.

***

Image result for Kanyemba District military base for russia

The planned Russian military base is not new and it dates back to several years back. Moscow just like Beijing and Washington also has long-term strategic goals to achieve in Zimbabwe. We now see movement because Mnangagwa and Putin share a lot in common, as they have led the intelligence services of their respective nations before earning the presidency. Information at hand suggests that Mnangagwa was told about the full military base plan, when he held a closed door meeting with Putin on the sidelines of the 10th BRICS Summit in Johannesburg , South Africa, in July 2018.”

Putin was once head of Russia’s KGB intelligence service now known as The Federal Security Service of the Russian Federation (FSB), while Mnangagwa was intelligence minister and Central Intelligence Organisation (CIO) boss at Independence in 1980.

During February 2017 it was reported that Russia had undertaken to assist the country in securing and monitoring her airspace with top of the range military and radar technology. The military technology, is said to include capabilities of paralysing and/or hacking spy satellite activities. A spy satellite is an Earth observation satelite or communications satellite deployed for military or intelligence applications.

Last year Mnangagwa without mentioning the mooted Russian army base in Zimbabwe, told a Russian publication, Sputnik, in an interview that Harare and Moscow had amicable ties in defense, when asked if his administration was expecting new contacts with Russia in buying arms and defense systems.

https://www.myzimbabwe.co.zw/news/38781-russian-president-putin-sets-eyes-on-opening-strategic-military-base-in-zimbabwe.html

****

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov is in Africa hoping to strengthen ties on the continent. His country is competing with China, the EU and the US for influence and resources. Lavrov recently visited Zimbabwe, where his country is pursuing military and mining cooperation.

The foreign affairs minister of Russia, Lavrof is in Africa to seek closer economic and political ties with the continent. His visit is timely since Russia is currently suffering from sanctions applied by the European Union and the US following its involvement in Ukraine. Russia’s intends to expand its economic ties with Africa while its economy is now affected by the ongoing sanctions. Moscow has signed a mining deal with Zimbabwe, a country that openly opposes the western powers. It is now looking to develop nuclear energy projects with countries like Angola and South Africa. While meeting the chairperson of the African Union Russia warned the European Union against meddling in Africa’s affairs. Russia is openly de-campaigning the imposers of its sanctions in Africa. It has disclosed that during the Libyan crisis while it supported AU’s idea of having political dialogue, the other western countries supported the NATO bombing of Libya that ended Muamar Ghaddafi’s 41 year reign and led to a civil war. Some analysts feel that welcoming Russia now might jeopardize Africa’s relationship with the European Union. The European Union is the chief funder of the African union commission, peace operations in Africa as well as Africa’s biggest trading partner. Before now, Russia has had minimum involvement in Africa

****

Zimbabwe-Russia Platinum

Zimbabwe a Russian colony??

Russia, Zimbabwe and minerals

Advertisements

4 gedagtes oor “Russia-Zimbabwe military base”

Lewer kommentaar

Verskaf jou besonderhede hieronder of klik op 'n logo om in te teken:

WordPress.com Logo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by WordPress.com. Log Out /  Verander )

Google photo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Google. Log Out /  Verander )

Twitter picture

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Twitter. Log Out /  Verander )

Facebook photo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Facebook. Log Out /  Verander )

Connecting to %s