Slovakia – Wooden churches and architectures

The Wooden Churches of the Slovak part of Carpathian Mountain Area are examples of local religious architecture. The eight churches consist of two Roman Catholic, three Protestant and three Greek Catholic ones.

The inscribed churches are:

  • Hervartov
  • Tvrdosin
  • Kezmarok
  • Lestiny
  • Hronsek (church and belfry)
  • Bodruzal
  • Ladomirová
  • Ruská Bystrá

Wooden Churches of the Slovak Carpathians


*

Bratislava’s Holy Saviour Church belongs to the Jesuit faith, however it was originally a protestant church. For this reason Gavin Shoebridge went exploring to discover some unusual characteristics not seen in Slovakia’s more common Catholic churches.

*

UNESCO
(Excellent video)

The Wooden Churches of the Slovak part of Carpathian Mountain Area inscribed on the World Heritage List consist of two Roman Catholic, three Protestant and three Greek Orthodox churches built between the 16th and 18th centuries. The property presents good examples of a rich local tradition of religious architecture, marked by the meeting of Latin and Byzantine cultures. The edifices exhibit some typological variations in their floor …

*

A pretty example of these churches can already be found next to the skansen in Bardejov Spa – a rebuilt Greek-catholic church from 1730, originally from Mikulasova and still in use.

Greek-Catholics religion is unusual combination of Catholics and Orthodox Church that still exists in eastern Slovakia with cathedral located in Prešov. As there is quite large minority of Rurthenians in Prague, they use originally roman-catholic church of S Kliment close to the Charles Bridge in Prague for purposes of their faith.

Wooden Churches of the Slovak Carpathians by Matejicek

https://www.worldheritagesite.org/list/Wooden+Churches+of+the+Slovak+Carpathians

*

The Wooden Churches of the Slovak part of Carpathian Mountain Area inscribed on the World Heritage List consist of two Roman Catholic, three Protestant and three Greek Orthodox churches built between the 16th and 18th centuries. The property presents good examples of a rich local tradition of religious architecture, marked by the meeting of Latin and Byzantine cultures. The edifices exhibit some typological variations in their floor plans, interior spaces and external appearance due to their respective religious practices. They bear testimony to the development of major architectural and artistic trends during the period of construction and to their interpretation and adaptation to a specific geographical and cultural context. Interiors are decorated with paintings on the walls and ceilings and other works of art that enrich the cultural significance of the properties.

Criterion (iii): The wooden churches offer an outstanding testimony to the traditional religious architecture of the north-western Carpathians region and to the inter-ethnic and inter-cultural character of a relatively small territory where Latin and Byzantine cultures have met and overlapped. The Lutheran churches serve as an exceptional example of religious tolerance in Upper Hungary during the period of bloody anti-Habsburgs rebellions and uprisings over the 17th century.

Criterion (iv): The wooden churches represent one of the best examples of European wooden religious architecture from the late Middle Ages to the end of 18th century. Their characteristic appearance, construction and at times rather naïve decoration derive from earlier local traditions, partially influenced by professional architectural concepts of Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque styles. Western (Latin) and eastern (Orthodox) building concepts are reflected in these wooden structures, creating specific religious architecture with diversified design, technical solutions and unique decorative expressions.

https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/1273/

This is one of the oldest wooden churches in eastern Slovakia. The Greek Catholic Church of Saint Nicholas was built in 1658 in the village of Bodružal.

*

Slovakia is one of very few European countries with no mosque, but that’s not the only struggle for a Muslim community denied official status. The Slovak parliament made it even more difficult for them to gain recognition.

*

Een gedagte oor “Slovakia – Wooden churches and architectures”

Laat 'n boodskap

Verskaf jou besonderhede hieronder of klik op 'n logo om in te teken:

WordPress.com Logo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by WordPress.com. Log Out /  Verander )

Google photo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Google. Log Out /  Verander )

Twitter picture

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Twitter. Log Out /  Verander )

Facebook photo

Jy lewer kommentaar met jou rekening by Facebook. Log Out /  Verander )

Connecting to %s