No control – geen beheer

Dis nie net Kaapstad nie, maar die hele Suid-Afrika wat gebuk gaan onder moorde, geweld en onbeheerde protesaksies – aksies wat die ANC – EFF en ander loods sedert 1994.  Polisie stop geen geweldadige betogings nie, rubberkoeëls skrik niemand af nie.  Die invoer van immigrante wat rondom stede en dorpe plak is in 25 jaar meer as die burgers self, almal verlang gratis gedienste HOP huise, skool en toelaes.   En selfs daarmee is dit nog nie die einde nie.   Hoeveel staan die polisie en hou geweld van ‘n afstand dop terwyl alles in vlamme opgaan, selfs polisie voertuie, min van die terroriste word in hegtenis geneem of selfs vervolg vir die terreurdade?   Bendegeweld is net so erg in die Wes-Kaap en ook in ander dele van die land.   Afrikaners en Boere maak voorsiening vir jul eie beveiliging.  Ons is al vir 25 jaar op ons eie.   Stel eie groepe in plek wat betroubaar is.

The City of Cape Town  said on Monday, the 10th of June, it was doing its utmost to assist the South African Police Service in curbing the apparent flare-up in gang violence in a number of suburbs around the city.

Mayoral committee member for safety and security JP Smith said the city’s Law Enforcement Department and Neighbourhood Safety Team were lending assistance to the Saps with numerous operations in Delft.

He said the city has already moved more staff to work overnight shifts, as that was when the violence was prevalent.

“Information at hand suggests the conflict in Blikkiesdorp was sparked by a gang member ejected from the area, who is trying to fight his way back in. In Hanover Park, we are assisted by ShotSpotter technology, although the shooting incidents have no pattern to them, making it difficult to deploy resources effectively,” Smith said.

He said the city has requested that the police’s Crime Intelligence Division help to stem the violence, which appears to be caused by a turf war between gangs.

Data showed that bigger caliber weapons were being used in addition to handguns and that there were elements within the taxi industry who were involved now too, Smith said. A taxi was torched last week.

“The situation in Manenberg has stabilized, which has allowed the Metro Police Gang and Drug Task Team to focus on Hanover Park. Bonteheuwel and Lavender Hill are also presenting challenges that require attention,” he said.

“However, the City’s Metro Police Department simply does not have enough boots on the ground to sustain interventions to the extent that Saps are required to by law. The situation will improve in the coming months courtesy of additional resources, but it will still take a while before these new officers complete their training,” added Smith.

Further interventions included adjusting shifts and deployments to respond to the pattern of late-night violence, redeploying staff over soft borders from other areas and ongoing engagement with Saps to see how and where the city could assist.

“We are investing more funding into our safety and security directorate, but this will be futile unless Saps too starts addressing its resource challenges. The intergovernmental dispute around the level of resourcing within Saps is a matter that needs to be resolved urgently if we are to make any meaningful impact in the areas worst affected by crime,” Smith said.

He further called on the community to assist both the city and Saps by reporting any incidents as they happen, or by sharing any intelligence that could lead to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the shooting incidents and the confiscation of the firearms involved.

https://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/western-cape/city-of-cape-town-steps-up-in-bid-to-curb-gang-bloodshed-25813692

***

Iolanda Steadman wrote on 4 June 2019

Lockdown on our farm today near Stellenbosch

Yesterday we heard about a white farmer murdered on the other side of Stellenbosch, about 5-8 km from us. I tried to get as much information on the web as possible. Door open, I thought, why?

At 6 in the evenings all our doors are closed. Animals inside. On go the lights, make sure that all windows are closed, bolts on and no keys in doors. Fort Knox will be ashamed.

When it is time to take our dogs for a wee the second phase starts. Gun in one hand, panic button in the other. One stands in the dark while the other is looking to see if all 11 dogs are fine.

Sometimes you hear a dog goes into the bushes or paddocks. Now what? Running to get the others inside, we need to get to the security company to go investigate. No, ok, it was nothing and we are fine for now.

I feel like a cowboy, target shooting the washing line. Prepared, be prepared my husband said. Me, who is the “Salvation Army”, of the Western Cape now focusing for a bulls-eye.

So it goes on for the past two years after they attacked our farm in 2017. Earlier that year in April both my brothers died five days apart and then my dad in July.

On 25 October 2017, I got at 2 in the morning a call on my cell. My sister in law and her twin girls of 15 screaming. I will never, ever forget that. My husband ran with the dog = a boot in one foot and a takkie in the other to go help. We didn’t know about armed response then.

Four guys were busy breaking down my sister’s bedroom door where they were hiding. White eyes, dark weapons, ready to grab the girls. While screams for help is heard all over the farm, they are getting excited because the white flesh is within their reach. You know what is lying ahead.

Was it not for my husband and our dogs, the death count on farm attacks might have been more. Death in my family might be 6 instead of 3 for 2017.

Just two days earlier Joubert Conradie was shot dead on his farm down the road.

People, where was I when this all happened?

Leopard crawling up the hill to the workers to help my husband. In the dark I fall and had to crawl. I am not sure if it was fear, hysteria or pure madness that had me hyperventilating at 2:15 in the morning. Like a Hollywood scene, I can see my husband standing there, dogs all around him, fighting for the girls innocence.

Now I am totally worked up, but this is only the beginning…

This morning a SOS call on the Emergency Group: another farm attack after Sunday 2 June’s murder: @ 6:40 am a mother was attacked with her small kids in the house.

Oh Sheila, this is also just a crow’s fly from us. Suddenly wide awake we are waiting for the updates. Tears are flowing because why is this happening? On your own place, in your own house? You live from 5 am until 6 pm. Then it is lockdown.

Now they even rob us of 5-7 am living time. I couldn’t work, nor could we take the horses out to the paddocks … Why?
Easy: we are on lockdown and waiting for the five men, heavily armed with guns, fleeing in our direction. Outside our farm, the farmers, security companies and police form a cordon = all looking through narrow eyes to see into the distance. Focusing on every movement, every maybe can be a lifesaver.

Helicopters in air = this is like a Hollywood special. Just we don’t get paid millions. We receive a bullet and a coffin.

Is immigration an option or not? What about my family here? My grandchild just turned 9. He loved our farm. You get hope, but then it crashes down and you ask: Where will we be safe? Not in South Africa.

I want you to read this and send it to your friends. This is how life is on a farm close to civilisation, very close. What will you do my friend? You who stay overseas and read this. Tell your friends about our life here in Stellenbosch.

***

Missing children 2017

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2016 Bendegeweld

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